Church Society logo              
    Building on the foundations      
Join RSS
 
Twitter Facebook
 
 

Welcome to Church Society online. We exist to strengthen local churches in biblical faith and to help shape the Church of England now and for the future. Do take a look at our blog, publications and other resources here.

  Click here for Crossway   Click here for Confident and Equipped  

Please consider supporting the work of Church Society

Donate
 
Photo of contributor

Posted by Tom Woolford, 22 May 2015

Tom Woolford considers an infamous line in the Prayer Book Baptism Service.

One of the most contentious parts of our Prayer Book is ‘that line’ in the baptism service: ‘seeing now this child is regenerate’. The line created a cause célèbre in the nineteenth century over a bishop’s refusal to institute George Gorham to an incumbency because of the latter’s denial of baptismal regeneration – a denial that his bishop argued put him outside the bounds of Anglican orthodoxy. In the court cases that followed, the meaning of both this line in the baptism service and the line in the Catechism that reads, ‘My Baptism wherein I was made a member of Christ,’ were vigorously debated.

Read more

dotted rule
Photo of contributor

Posted by Sophia Akouo , 20 May 2015

Paul Hancock from Trinity Buxton preached recently on 1 Thessalonians about being ready for the return of Jesus.

In his sermon from 1 Thessalonians 1:1-10, Paul Hancock talks about how believers can be ready for the return of Jesus.

Read more

dotted rule
Photo of contributor

Posted by Chris Kilgour, 14 May 2015

Do we have a poor understanding of Ecclesiology? Are evangelicals focussed purely on individual salvation and church attendance as for personal edification? Might we end up accepting "the modern liberal-catholic-ecumenical consensus doctrine" because it is "better than nothing," an outcome that described as "a slow poison to any evangelical and reformed church"? In today's featured article, Donald Allister looks at some responses to these challenges, and offers encouragement and caution to evangelicals.

The body of the article considers four ways of looking at the church before moving on to seven contrasts in an evangelical ecclesiology: universal but also local; eternal but also temporal; historical but also changing; corporate but also individual; guarding but also exploring; comprehensive but also cultic; missionary but also pastoral.

Read more